ISPOR Essential HEOR Education Short Course Program Is Now Virtual

The renowned ISPOR Short Course Program is offered in conjunction with ISPOR conferences around the world as a series of half- and full-day training courses, designed to enhance knowledge and techniques in core HEOR topics as well as emerging trends is now virtual. Taught by expert faculty, short courses topics are offered across 7 topical tracks and range in skill level from introductory to experienced. 

Upcoming Virtual Short Course Programs

Expand your HEOR knowledge from the safety and comfort of your office. Our expert Short Course faculty are presenting the same curriculum offered at ISPOR in-person events through an interactive virtual experience. The courses are not recorded so attendance in the live-broadcast is important. These hand-picked virtual courses, along with their electronic course books, provide a solid foundation in essential methodologies and emerging issues.

Wednesday, June 17, 2020:
US Payers - Understanding the Healthcare System

LEVEL - Introductory
TRACK - Health Policy & Regulatory

DESCRIPTION

The US healthcare system is a hybrid system that provides access to care via various channels and means. It can be categorized as: governmental systems (Medicare, Medicaid, Veterans Health Administration, and Department of Defense, etc), private markets (privately sponsored regional and national health plans), and providers assuming responsibility for access and coverage via mechanisms such as Provider Networks, Integrated Delivery Networks (IDNs), Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), etc. These elements are quite heterogeneous and characterized by different coverage and access mechanisms. This introductory course will cover the roots of the current US system, its evolutionary process, and the consequent independence of these different parts of the system. The focus will be on value and affordability as defined by cost, access, and quality. While all hold value and affordability as important goals, the different stakeholders take various perspectives and define these goals differently. This results in different objectives, incentives, and principles under which they operate. The intent of this course is to better understand characteristics of the different parts of the US healthcare system and the role of various decision makers within it. The course will cover their structure, scope, processes, and perspectives as well as their approach to balancing access, costs and quality. The course will also cover how industry and others produce evidence to support access and reimbursement decisions and how the evidence is used by decision makers. This session will facilitate the increased level of understanding of these disparate systems and emphasize the need to effectively communicate evidence to various access decision makers to support and enhance evidence driven decision making on value and affordability. This course is designed for those having limited experience in understanding the structure of the US Healthcare system, including its various subsystems and how they operate. The course will focus on how these entities differ in perspectives, coverage mechanisms, and the means and evidence they use to define and achieve both value (access and quality) and affordability.

This course begins at 10:00AM EDT and has a lunch break from 12:00PM - 1:00PM EDT. The course will continue with an afternoon session from 1:00PM - 3:00PM EDT.

FACULTY MEMBERS

 

Finn Børlum Kristensen, MD, PhD
Professor
Department of Public Health
Research Unit of User Perspectives, Faculty of Health Sciences
University of Southern Denmark
Hillerod, Denmark

James Murray, PhD
Research Fellow
Global Health Outcomes and Real World Evidence
Center of Expertise, Eli Lilly and Company
Carmel, IN, USA

Jessica Daw, PharmD, MBA
Senior Director
Clinical Pharmacy
UPMC Health Plan
Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Laura Pizzi, PharmD, MPH, RPh
Professor & Director
Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Program
Pharmacy Practice and Administration
Rutgers University
Piscataway, NJ, USA

 


Thursday, June 18, 2020:
Budget Impact Analysis I - A 6-Step Approach

LEVEL - Intermediate
TRACK - Economic Evaluation

DESCRIPTION

This course will describe the methods used to estimate the budget impact of a new health care technology, and will present 6 basic steps for estimating budget impact: (1) estimating the target population; (2) selecting a time horizon; (3) identifying current and projected treatment mix; (4) estimating current and future drug costs; (5) estimating change in disease-related costs; and (6) estimating and presenting changes in annual budget impact and health outcomes. Both static and dynamic methods for estimating the budget and health impact of adding a new drug to a health plan formulary will be presented. These six steps will be illustrated using actual budget impact models. This course is designed for those with some experience with pharmacoeconomic analysis.

This course begins at 10:00AM EDT and has a lunch break from 12:00PM - 1:00PM EDT. The course will continue with an afternoon session from 1:00PM - 3:00PM EDT.

FACULTY MEMBERS
C. Daniel Mullins, PhD
Professor & Chair
Pharmaceutical Health Services Research
University of Maryland, School of Pharmacy
Baltimore, MD, USA

Stephanie R. Earnshaw, PhD, MS
Senior Vice President, Health Economics
RTI Health Solutions
Research Triangle Park, NC, USA

Thor-Henrik Brodtkorb, PhD
Senior Director, Health Economics
RTI Health Solutions
Ljungskile, Sweden

 


Tuesday, June 23, 2020:
A Health Economics Approach to US Value Assessment Frameworks

LEVEL - Introductory
TRACK - Health Technology Assessment

DESCRIPTION

This short course will focus on the recent ISPOR Special Task Force Report, “A Health Economics Approach to US Value Frameworks.” It will begin with an overview of recent US value assessment frameworks, with emphasis on the importance of perspective and decision context in the construction and use of value frameworks. It will then review how a health economics approach from a societal or health plan perspective leads to use of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) to help guide efficient resource allocation. There will be in-depth discussion of how measuring some aspects of the value of health benefits could augment the standard cost-per-quality-adjusted-life-year metric for CEA. Elements such as value of insurance, value of “hope,” real option value, severity of illness, and several others, have the potential to better capture how patients and/or society value the benefits of some treatments; each one is based on some research findings and some case examples will be shown. The course will then review how budget considerations, cost-effectiveness thresholds, and opportunity costs enter CEA-based decision-making. Next faculty will review broader approaches to cost-benefit aggregation and value-based decision-making, including extended CEA, augmented CEA (introduced by this Report), and multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA), with an overview of issues and new approaches to MCDA. It then discusses the strengths and weaknesses of recent US value assessment frameworks from this health economic perspective, and closes with a review of the high-level recommendations of this Special Task Force.

This course begins at 10:00AM EDT and has a lunch break from 12:00PM - 1:00PM EDT. The course will continue with an afternoon session from 1:00PM - 3:00PM EDT.

FACULTY MEMBERS

Louis P. Garrison, PhD
Professor Emeritus
Department of Pharmacy
University of Washington,The Comparative Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics Institute
Seattle, WA, USA

Richard Willke, PhD
Chief Science Officer
ISPOR
Lawrenceville, NJ, USA

Charles E. Phelps, PhD, MBA
University Professor and Provost Emeritus
Office of the Provost
University of Rochester
Gualala, CA, USA


Thursday, June 25, 2020:
Introduction to Health Technology Assessment

LEVEL - Introductory
TRACK - Health Technology Assessment

DESCRIPTION

This introductory course is designed to teach academic researchers, health policy decision makers, manufacturers, and clinicians about the key elements, methods, and language of health technology assessment (HTA). The course provides an overview of basic HTA principles including benefit assessment (biostatistics, clinical epidemiology, patient-relevant outcomes, risk-benefit assessment), economic evaluation (costing, cost-effectiveness analysis, pharmacoeconomic modeling, budget impact analysis, resource allocation), and ELSI (ethical, legal, and social implications). Using real world examples covering both drugs and devices, the course will review the practical steps involved in developing and using HTA reports in different countries and health care systems. Group discussion will focus on the perspectives of different stakeholders and the implementation of HTA in health care decision making. This course is suitable for those with little or no experience with HTA.

This course begins at 10:00AM EDT and has a lunch break from 12:00PM - 1:00PM EDT. The course will continue with an afternoon session from 1:00PM - 3:00PM EDT.

FACULTY MEMBERS

 

Uwe Siebert, MPH, MSc, ScD, MD
Professor & Chair of Public Health
Medical Decision Making and Health Technology Assessment and Chair
Department of Public Health
Heath Services Research and Health Technology Assessment
UMIT - University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology
Innsbruck, Austria

Petra Schnell-Inderst, MPH, PhD, Dipl. Biol
Senior Scientist
Head, Program on Health Technology Assessment Institute of Public Health
Medical Decision Making and Health Technology Assessment Dept. of Public Health
Health Services Research and Health Technology Assessment
UMIT - University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology
Innsbruck, Austria

Thursday, July 2, 2020:
Market Access & Value Assessment of Medical Devices

LEVEL - Intermediate
TRACK - Health Policy & Regulatory

DESCRIPTION

This course is designed for those with an intermediate knowledge of medical devices and their market access pathways. The focus will be on understanding the areas of United States (US) and European Union (EU) healthcare systems relevant to medical devices (eg, diagnosis-related groups (DRGs), inpatient versus outpatient), implicit value drivers of medical devices, the stakeholder organizations necessary to engage in order to obtain medical device funding/reimbursement and adoption, and the healthcare system pathways through which medical devices can be implemented. The course will conclude with a primer on performance-based risk-sharing agreements. Market access for medical devices is an evolving, multi-faceted, and multi-stakeholder journey that requires dedicated knowledge. Experience in launching pharmaceutical products can present both challenges and opportunities for medical device companies, as the pathways, evidence requirements, and value domains are materially different. This course will attempt to demystify the medical device landscape and help all stakeholders ensure that appropriate patients benefit from innovation in the medical device space through improving participants’ awareness of marketplace trends and needs to demonstrate clinical and economic value.

This course begins at 10:00AM EDT and has a lunch break from 12:00PM - 1:00PM EDT. The course will continue with an afternoon session from 1:00PM - 3:00PM EDT.

FACULTY MEMBERS

Michael Drummond, MCom, DPhil
Professor of Health Economics
Centre for Health Economics
University of York
Lichfield, UK


Stephen Hull, MHS
Principal & Founder
Hull Associates LLC
Rockland, MA, USA


Belinda A. Mohr, PhD
Lead Health Economist
W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc.
Phoenix, AZ USA


Brian W. Bresnahan, PhD
Research Associate Professor
Department of Radiology
University of Washington and Harborview Medical Center
Seattle, WA, USA


Wednesday, July 8, 2020:
Risk-Sharing/Performance-Based Arrangements for Drugs and Other Medical Products

LEVEL - Intermediate
TRACK - Health Policy & Regulatory

DESCRIPTION

There is significant and growing interest among both the payers and producers of medical products for arrangements that involve a “pay-for-performance” or “risk-sharing” element. These payment schemes involve a plan by which the performance of the product is tracked in a defined patient population over a specified period of time and the level of reimbursement is tied by formula to the outcomes achieved. Although these agreements have an intrinsic appeal, there can be substantial barriers to their implementation. Issues surrounding theory and practice, including incentives and barriers, will be analyzed along with several examples of performance-based schemes from Europe, the United States, and Australia. A hypothetical case study will be used in an interactive session to illustrate a systematic approach to weighing their applicability and feasibility.

This course begins at 10:00AM EDT and has a lunch break from 12:00PM - 1:00PM EDT. The course will continue with an afternoon session from 1:00PM - 3:00PM EDT.

PREREQUISITES

 

It will be helpful for individuals to have completed the short course, “Elements of Pharmaceutical / Biotech Pricing I – Introduction,” or to be familiar with both the key determinants of pharmaceutical pricing and the main international health systems.

FACULTY MEMBERS

Louis P. Garrison, PhD
Professor Emeritus
Department of Pharmacy
University of Washington,The Comparative Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics Institute
Seattle, WA, USA

Adrian Towse, MA, MPhil
Director Emeritus & Senior Research Fellow
Office of Health Economics
London, UK

Joshua Carlson, MPH, PhD
Associate Professor
Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program
Department of Pharmacy
University of Washington
Seattle, WA, USA


Monday-Thursday, July 13-16, 2020:
Introduction to Health Economics and Outcomes Research

LEVEL - Introductory
TRACK - Economic Evaluation

DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to teach clinicians and new researchers how to incorporate health economics into study design and data analysis. Participants will first review the basic principles and concepts of health economic evaluations, then discuss how to collect and calculate the costs of different alternatives, determine the economic impact of clinical outcomes, and how to identify, track, and assign costs to different types of health care resources used. Different health economics models and techniques will be demonstrated, including cost-minimization, cost-effectiveness, cost-benefit, cost-utility, and budget impact analysis. Decision analysis, sensitivity analysis, and discounting will all be demonstrated and practiced. This course is suitable for those with little or no experience with health economics.

This course is scheduled for 4 consecutive days from 10:00AM - 12:00PM EDT beginning Monday, July 13 continuing daily through July 16.

FACULTY MEMBERS

 

Lorne Basskin, PharmD
Professor
Healthcare Economics and Outcomes Research
School of Pharmacy
Charleston University
Charleston, WV, USA


Monday, July 27, 2020:
New! Introduction to Machine Learning Methods

LEVEL - Intermediate
TRACK - Methodological & Statistical Research

DESCRIPTION

Healthcare data are often available to payers and health care systems in real time, but are massive, high dimensional, and complex. Machine learning merges statistics, computer science, artificial intelligence, and information theory and offers powerful computational tools to enhance the extraction of useful information from complex healthcare data, build highly interpretable models, and make accurate predictions. This course gives an overview of basic machine learning concepts, and provides an introduction to a few commonly used machine learning techniques and their practical applications in healthcare and pharmaceutical outcomes research. Participants will be introduced to foundational principles and concepts of statistical machine learning, then be provided with several specific machine learning techniques and their applications in health and pharmaceutical outcomes research. Different machine learning approaches using R will be demonstrated including tree-based methods, penalized regression, and neural networks analysis, as well as techniques for dimension reduction/feature selection. Participants will have hands-on practical experiences with machine learning and gain experience interpreting and evaluating the results and prediction performance that comes from machine learning modeling.

Distinguishing prediction modeling from research on real-world data meant for causal inference in pharmacoepidemiology will be also presented and discussed. This is an entry-level course, but is designed for those with some familiarity with traditional statistical modeling techniques (eg, linear regression, logistic regression). Participants who wish to gain hands-on experience will need R and RStudio installed on their computers.

This course begins at 10:00AM EDT and has a lunch break from 12:00PM - 1:00PM EDT. The course will continue with an afternoon session from 1:00PM - 3:00PM EDT.

FACULTY MEMBERS

Wei-Hsuan Jenny Lo-Ciganic, PhD, MS, MSPharm
Assistant Professor
College of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmaceutical Outcomes & Policy
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL, USA

Hao Helen Zhang, PhD
Department of Mathematics
University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ, USA

John D. Seeger, PharmD, DrPH
Chief Scientific Officer, Epidemiology
Optum, Boston, MA, USA


Thursday, July 30, 2020:
Causal Inference and Causal Diagrams in Big, Real-World Observational Data and Pragmatic Trials

LEVEL - Experienced
TRACK - Real World Data & Information Systems

DESCRIPTION

Innovative causal inference methods are needed for the design and analysis of big real-world observational data and pragmatic trials. This course will provide an introduction to the principles of causation in comparative effectiveness research, the use of causal diagrams (directed acyclic graphs; DAGs), and focus on causal inference methods for time-independent confounding (multivariate regression, propensity scores) and time-dependent confounding (g-formula, marginal structural models with inverse probability of treatment weighting, and structural nested models with g-estimation). The “target trial” concept and a counterfactual approach with “replicates” will be used to apply causal methods to big real-world datasets with case examples from oncology, cardiovascular disease, HIV, nutrition and obstetrics. The course will consist of lectures, exercises drawn from the published literature and interactive discussion. The intended audience includes researchers from all substance matter fields, statisticians, epidemiologists, outcome researchers, health economists and health policy decision makers interested either in methods of causal analysis or causal interpretation of results based on the underlying method.

PREREQUISITES

Previous attendance at the ISPOR short course, “Introduction to the Design & Analysis of Observational Studies of Treatment Effects Using Retrospective Data Sources”, or equivalent knowledge, is recommended.

This course begins at 10:00AM EDT and has a lunch break from 12:00PM - 1:00PM EDT. The course will continue with an afternoon session from 1:00PM - 3:00PM EDT.

FACULTY MEMBERS

Uwe Siebert, MPH, MSc, ScD, MD
Professor & Chair of Public Health
Medical Decision Making and Health Technology Assessment and Chair
Department of Public Health
Heath Services Research and Health Technology Assessment
UMIT - University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology
Innsbruck, Austria

Douglas E. Faries, PhD
Sr Research Fellow
Global Statistical Sciences
Eli Lilly and Company
Indianapolis, IN, USA

Felicitas Kuehne, MSc
Senior Scientist
Institute of Public Health
Medical Decision Making and Health Technology Assessment
UMIT
Innsbruck, Austria


Registration Rates

8 Hour | 4 Day  Short CourseNon-member
Rate
Member Rate
Standard $640$512
Clinical/Government/Academia$480$384
Full-Time Students (must provide current enrollment docs)$200$160
Patient Representative$200$160
  
4 Hour | 1 Day Short CourseNon-memberMember Rate
Standard$320$256
Clinical/Government/Academia $240$192
Full-Time Students (must provide current enrollment docs)$100$80
Patient Representative$100$80

The cancellation date for short courses is 2 weeks before the course. All cancellation requests must be made in writing and emailed to ISPOR Registration. A $50.00 cancellation fee applies. After the 2 week period no refund can be provided.



Additional Short Course Program Details

Short Course Tracks

ISPOR short courses are offered across the following topical tracks:

  • Economic Evaluation
  • Methodological & Statistical Research
  • Study Approaches
  • Real World Data & Information Systems
  • Patient-Centered Research
  • Health Policy & Regulatory
  • Health Technology Assessment

Short Course Core Curriculum

ISPOR short course core curriculum is defined as essential curriculum for professional success in the HEOR field; courses/topic areas that are offered at all conferences and the building blocks of a fundamental curriculum that can be applied to future educational programs/offerings.

  • Economic Evaluation
    • Introduction to Health Economics and Outcomes Research
    • Statistical Methods for Health Economics and Outcomes Research
    • Budget Impact Analysis I – A 6-Step Approach
  • Methodology & Statistical Methods
    • Introduction to Modeling Methods
  • Study Approaches
    • Introduction to the Design & Database Analysis of Observational Studies of Treatment Effects
    • Meta-analysis & Systematic Literature Review
    • Network Meta-Analysis
  • Patient-Centered Research
    • Introduction to Patient-Reported Outcomes
    • Utility Measures
  • Health Policy & Regulatory
    • Elements of Pharmaceutical/Biotech Pricing
    • Risk-Sharing/Performance-Based Arrangements for Drugs and Other Medical Products
    • Global Payers/US Payers
  • Health Technology Assessment
    • Introduction to Health Technology Assessment

 

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