Economic Burden of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Among Patients with Commercial Insurance

Author(s)

Li M1, Liao K2, Flowers C2
1Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA, 2University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to estimate the economic burden of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) among patients with commercial insurance.

METHODS: This study is a retrospective cohort study using a large, nationwide database of administrative health claims for members of large commercial and Medicare Advantage health plans. We identified adult patients newly diagnosed with NHL between January 01, 2017 and June 30, 2021. We matched NHL patients to non-cancer controls using age, sex, race and ethnicity, and year of diagnosis at a ratio of 1:5. We then estimated age-, sex-, race and ethnicity-, comorbidity-, and diagnosis year-adjusted spending (total and patient out-of-pocket [OOP], medical and pharmacy) of cases and controls within one year after index diagnosis. For non-cancer controls, we randomly assigned an index date to them. We used generalized linear model with gamma family to estimate the adjusted spending.

RESULTS: A total of 5,672 NHL patients and 28,360 matched controls were included in this analysis. The mean adjusted total spending within one year after index diagnosis was $196,908 (95% CI: $196,621-$197,194) for NHL patients and $13,304 (95% CI: $13,286-$13,322) for non-cancer matched controls. The mean adjusted patient OOP spending within one year after diagnosis was $4,448 (95% CI: $4,385-$4,398) for NHL patients and $809 (95% CI: $808-$811) for non-cancer controls. The mean adjusted medical spending was $170,762 (95% CI: $170,537-$170,988) for NHL patients and $11,552 (95% CI: $11,542-$11,563) for non-cancer controls. The mean adjusted pharmacy spending was $4,581 (95% CI: $4,575-$4,588) for NHL patients and $2,139 (95% CI: $2,137-$2,141) for non-cancer controls.

CONCLUSIONS: During the year after diagnosis, NHL patients’ total healthcare spending was more than 10 times higher than otherwise similar non-cancer matched controls and OOP spending was more than 5 times greater. This research reveals the substantial financial burden that a new diagnosis with NHL places on patients and the health system.

Conference/Value in Health Info

2024-05, ISPOR 2024, Atlanta, GA, USA

Value in Health, Volume 27, Issue 6, S1 (June 2024)

Code

EE378

Topic

Economic Evaluation, Study Approaches

Disease

Oncology

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