Plenary Sessions
Monday, 31 October 2016
8:45 - 10:45
Room: Hall A (L2)
FIRST PLENARY SESSION: WHAT SYNERGIES COULD BE CREATED BETWEEN REGULATORY AND HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENTS?
Decisions taken by regulators and health care payers, the latter informed by HTA bodies, determine which patient groups have access to new therapies and at what point in time. While these decision makers have different roles, they often rely on almost the same scientific data about new products; they also share the broad goal of enabling access for patients to beneficial therapies. Yet, formal interactions and collaboration between regulators and the HTA bodies that inform payers have only started in recent years in the European Union (EU) and are mostly in a pilot stage. This plenary session explores hitherto unrealised synergies in the work and processes of regulators and HTA bodies. Panelists will also address the roadblocks in the EU health sector ecosystem that need to be removed in order to realise the synergies while respecting their different roles. 
Moderator: Hans-Georg Eichler, MD, MSc bio
Senior Medical Officer, European Medicines Agency (EMA), London, UK
Speaker: Guido Rasi
Executive Director, European Medicines Agency (EMA), London, UK
Speaker: Wim Goettsch, PhD
Secretariat Director, EUnetHTA JA3, Diemen, The Netherlands
Speaker: Andrzej Rys
Director, Health Systems, Medical Products and Innovation, European Commission, Brussels, Belgium
Speaker: Jens Grueger, PhD
Vice President & Head of Global Pricing & Market Access, F. Hoffmann-LaRoche, Basel, Switzerland
Tuesday, 1 November 2016
10:15 - 12:00
Room: Hall A (L2)
SECOND PLENARY SESSION: DIFFERENTIAL PRICING OF MEDICINES IN EUROPE: IMPLICATIONS FOR ACCESS, INNOVATION, AND AFFORDABILITY
Each year only 30 to 40 new patent-protected medicines are launched worldwide.  From an economic perspective, they are unique global public goods—with high average fixed costs of development and low marginal costs of production and distribution.  Given differences among countries in their ability and willingness to pay for healthcare, health economists have long argued that differential pricing for medicines across countries could improve global dynamic efficiency.  But law in the European Union supporting the free movement of goods makes it difficult to maintain different prices in different countries.  Countries have resorted to referencing prices in other countries to support their local pricing policies and negotiations, and have developed schemes that allow them to obtain confidential discounts.  The resulting patterns of price differences and access limitations are falling far short of what a coherent approach might produce.  This session will explore options for a defined and systematic approach to promoting efficient differential pricing in Europe.  Operational and political feasibility are key considerations in moving toward a sustainable policy.
Moderator: Lou Garrison, PhD bio
Professor, Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research & Policy Program, School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
Speaker: Sabine Vogler, PhD
Program Coordinator, Pharmacoeconomics and Pharmaceutical Policy Analysis, Head of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Pharmaceutical Pricing and Reimbursement Policies, Gesundheit Österreich GmbH (GÖG / Austrian Public Health Institute), Vienna, Austria
Speaker: Jo De Cock
Chief Executive Officer, National Institute of Health and Disability Insurance (NIHDI), Brussels, Belgium
Speaker: Panos Kanavos, PhD
Associate Professor & Deputy Director, LSE Health, Department of Social Policy, London School of Economics, London, UK
Speaker: Adrian Towse, MA, MPhil bio
Director, Office of Health Economics, London, UK
Wednesday, 2 November 2016
11:15 - 12:45
Room: Hall A (L2)
THIRD PLENARY SESSION: HOW TO CONTROL COSTS AND IMPROVE ACCESS TO MEDICINES: LESSONS FROM THE INTERQUALITY PROJECT
This session will describe a number of important themes emerging from the InterQuality Project.  One key finding was the importance of equity of access to health services and medicines. For example, the proportion of households with “catastrophic” out-of-pocket health spending in Poland was much higher than in either Denmark or Germany, and concentrated in the worst-off groups of senior citizens.  The new Minister of Health launched a program of free medicines for senior citizens of Poland.  A second important theme was how evidence on patients’ preferences can be integrated into health technology assessment (HTA) using efficiency frontier concept to identify the most efficient strategy within a disease class in regulatory decision-making in Germany.  Finally, while most European Union (EU) member states promote the implementation of innovative analytical methods or e-health tools, such as e-prescribing, these efforts are not part of an integrated package. Currently, no single agent manages insured patients’ access to medicines and healthcare in a coordinated manner.  More attention should be paid by EU member states to an institutional framework integrating the various methods and e-health tools to enhance benefits to both individuals and societies.
Moderator: Tomasz Hermanowski, PhD
InterQuality Project Leader and Professor & Head, Department of Pharmacoeconomics, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
Speaker: Anna Zawada, MSc
Director, Transparency and Tariff Councils Office, Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Tariff System (AOTMiT), Warsaw, Poland
Speaker: Joanna Lis, MSc, MBA, PhD
Director, Market Access, Sanofi-Aventis, Warsaw, Poland
Speaker: Axel Muehlbacher, PhD
Professor, Neubrandenburg University, Neubrandenburg, Germany
Speaker: Brian K. Solow, MD, FAAFP
Chief Medical Officer, Optum Life Sciences, Irvine, CA, USA
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